Of Passwords and PINS (3)

8 02 2013

In the final part of this series I’ll look at PINs and what you can do to make them easier to remember.

PIN numbers, generally 4 digits, and used to validate debit and credit cards, lock your i-phone, access buildings, secure safes and all manner of  other things have become one of those things we all have to remember. The 4 digit card PIN only offers 10,000 possible combinations, so it’s not really that secure, which is why so many systems operate the ‘3-strikes and you’re out’ control. But why only 4 digits? For the answer you have to ask John Shepherd-Barron the inventor of the ATM. It seems that Mr Shepherd-Barron favoured using 6 digits, but his wife preferred 4!

In the same way as there are commonly used passwords (see the previous post for more details), there are some PINs which appear on an all too frequent basis. A recent analysis by Data Genetics revealed how unimaginative people are.  Over 10% of the PIN codes analysed were 1234, and 6% were 1111. The least common PIN was 8068, but probably best not to use that now as the bad guys can also read the reports.

Maybe you need a different approach. In the same way as you can have a memorable password, why not have memorable PINs? No! Not your birthday, or your partners birthday, or your house number, too many people already know them. But why not use the letters A through J to reflect the numbers 1 to 0, and create a combination that is meaningful to you? First four words of a favourite tune, initials of four family members, first four letters of you home town.

Most organisations which require you to have a PIN allow you to change them, usually on-line or at the ATM, so that’s not much of a chore, BUT, don’t change them all to the same value. Like passwords, it makes sense to have a variety of PINs, and to he honest you’re unlikely to have as many PINs as you have passwords (unless you collect credit cards as a hobby).

The standard instruction (as with passwords) is not to write them down, but again, as with passwords, there are variations on a theme. Clearly no-one would write in their diary: Barclaycard 1234; Amex 3456; M&S 4567 would they (pause whilst some readers tear page out of diary), but it is possible to be more discreet and still record those which you use less often in the same way as you can record passwords.

The frequently used ones you will remember because you use them everyday, especially if you have made the memorable in the first place.

Anyway, that’s enough on Passwords and PINs, next time I’m going to start on Social Engineering and how the bad guys WILL obtain those carefully protected pieces of information you have created.

Until then, keep safe and keep aware

David

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